Effects of Bludging Pre and Post Christmas (ie the Effects of Detraining)

Planning on taking it easy in the lead up to Christmas because it is the party season after all? Think again!

Cutting back or missing sessions will be detrimental to your strength and fitness – ‘Use it or Lose It‘ rings very true here!

If you back off before Christmas and then continue to do less over the Christmas break, you will potentially be detraining for up to 10 weeks! (it’s only 6 weeks until Christmas now and then most of you take a break or go on holidays after Christmas!)

The Facts

Detraining (short-term <4 weeks)

  • Strength can be maintained without training up to 3-4 weeks, but is gradually lost thereafter (strictly speaking, you can temporarily lose strength before this, but it comes back so quickly during retraining that it doesn’t matter)
  • Muscles start to atrophy (reduce in size) after 2-3 weeks, though gains usually come back quickly, at least in beginners. Trained athletes or those with a long training history may take longer to get back to where they left off.
  • Endurance performance decreases by 4 to 25% after 3-4 weeks. That’s huge and hurts to get back. That hill that used to feel OK now feels like a mountain!
  • VO2 max (your maximum oxygen consumption and an indicator of fitness) declines by 6 to 20% at around 4 weeks of detraining.
  • Beginners can maintain endurance performance for at least 2 weeks without training, though recent VO2max gains can be reversed after 4 weeks. So if you are just starting out and feeling great then stop training over Christmas, you’ll be starting again from scratch. Remember that feeling when you first started? Do you really want to go back there?
  • Muscle, strength, endurance, and fat gains/losses vary from person to person. Some will suffer more than others.
  • Flexibility is reduced after 4 weeks of detraining by 7-30%
  • Bed rest/immobilisation/sedentary behaviour (sunbaking?) speeds up muscle atrophy – sleeping in shrinks muscles!
  • Lastly, your metabolism slows (due to loss of lean muscle and less activity) which will lead to weight gain.

 

Maintaining Gains and Fitness over a Break

  • To maintain strength during 4+ weeks of detraining, train at least once per week (for beginners) and twice a week for more trained athletes.
  • To maintain hypertrophy during 4+ weeks of detraining, train at least once per week (for beginners).
  • To maintain endurance during 4+ weeks of detraining, you can lower training volume by 60 to 90%, training frequency by no more than 20-30% in athletes,  but beginners can reduce it by 50 to 70%. Training intensity should be the same. Therefore, if you do less, it still needs to be a hard workout to be effective. The odd walk won’t cut it.
  • If injured, use alternative training forms such as strength training (which can maintain some endurance performance) or underwater running, cycling or swimming.

 

So – if you are pondering taking it easy over the Christmas break, remember that being active should be a year long/life long habit, not something to stop and start. Something is better than nothing so even if its 30mins, just get out there and move each day over the break.

Summer BeachFit 2016 – The Fastest Way To Get Fit and Get Over the Christmas Blowout!

Christmas Festivities getting to your waistline already? Book in Now to Blow Off the Post Christmas Belly Bulge and Start 2016 Fit and Fresh!

Bookings for Summer 2016 Now Open! But Hurry – numbers are limited!

 

BeachFit is a 10 Week Intensive Program that is run by Energy Fitness 3 times a year at Greenhills Beach Cronulla, in the Sutherland Shire.

With the help of the Beach and the Sand Dunes, this high intensity program produces great results year after year (it started in 2006).

The benefits of running on sand are many:

  • Increased effort burns more calories
  • Great for improving leg strength, muscle stabilisation and core
  • Low impact on soft sand is great for joints
  • Increases in fitness are gained quickly
  • Weigh-ins before and after program show consistent body fat loss across participants
  • All participants notice a marked improvement in fitness, body composition, muscle tone and endurance
  • Variety of training in both sandhills and on the beach as well as water work when weather permits.

BeachFit is held in a low key, supportive atmosphere, and there is no ‘bootcamp’ yelling and abuse – just hard work and lots of fun. Every 90min session is different. Finish the session with a swim to cool off (if you’re not already wet) and you will start the day feeling amazing. Completing each session gives you a great feeling of accomplishment and you are guaranteed to enjoy yourself and get the results you want!

Programs are run October-Dec, and Feb-April. All sessions start from the carpark at Greenhills, Cronulla.

The Next BeachFit Program starts Monday 1st February 2016 and runs until 6th April, 2016.

For More Information and to make a booking or enquiry please visit the Energy Fitness Website here.

Bookings are now open, limited numbers available per day.

RESULTS ARE GUARANTEED (the program has been running for almost 10 years with consistent results) AND SUPPORTED WITH NUTRITIONAL ADVICE OVER THE 10 WEEKS.

Testimonials

“I have participated in a number of Simone’s BeachFit training programmes over the past 18 months. Simone offers a fantastic 10 week programme based around high intensity training on sand which is low impact on joints making recovery from each session much easier with little or no soreness in between sessions.

Like many things in life you get out of it what you put into it. If you follow Simone’s training programme and her dietary recommendations & suggestions you are guaranteed to achieve your desired results whether that be weight loss, building muscle mass or general increased level of fitness.

You can achieve even better results if you supplement Simone’s two weekly sessions with one or two other exercise sessions per week. Simone makes the sessions as much fun as possible and no two training sessions are ever the same which is the thing I liked most.

I would not hesitate to recommend Energy Fitness BeachFit to anyone !!”

 Brad Smith, Gymea Bay

 

“Beach fit offers me everything that I need for an awesome workout!  I find the combination of waves, sun, sand and movement a perfect workout for me.  Beach fit has helped me to look and feel stronger. I have also noticed a tremendous increase in my energy level.

In conjunction with running Beach fit has enhanced my level of fitness.  It provides an all over body workout in the best environment imaginable. The mix of working out on the beach one week to sand hills the next provides a varied workout that never gets boring.

A few years ago I took up the challenge of ultra-marathons and beach fit provides me with the extra leg strength required to help me be stronger and fitter to reach the end of those long runs. I can honestly say I can run for 3 hours and not feel as exhausted or exhilarated as doing a session of beach fit.

I enjoy the workouts and look forward to every class”

Susan Jay, Gymea Bay

The Benefits of Strength Training and How to Improve Your Metabolism

 

When most of us think of getting fit, the first thing we think of is that we will be losing weight and burning body fat. But in fact, unless you are obese, these may be the last things you need to think about. Sure, losing that last 5 kilos is always a bonus and generally the hardest weight to shift, and as every woman (and man) knows we always feel a little better when we are less rounded or ‘bloated’. But do we think about what else we gain when we embark on a new training regime or lift those weights to fatigue in class? We should!

Muscular strength and endurance, along with cardiovascular and aerobic improvement, body composition (percentage of body fat to muscle) and metabolic changes should be high on your list of goals to achieve through training. Strength training is essential to achieve the above.

This article is about the importance of being involved in Resistance/Strength Training, especially for women, and not essentially about weight loss.

Many women are literally afraid to lift weights, but the National Strength and Conditioning Association provides these stand points on Training for Women, and if followed, will help you stay healthy, strong and slim for your lifetime. Of course most of these points relate to men too, so you blokes out there – read on!

  1. Proper strength and conditioning exercise programs  may increase athletic performance, improve physiological function (day to day activities) and reduce the risk of injury as we age and are beneficial to both males and females.
  2. Females can hypertrophy (increase muscle size) through resistance training, relatively the same as men, but not absolutely the same. Females have the same muscle fibre types as men, but they are smaller in their cross-sectional area, hence their smaller size gains.
  3. Females will not ‘bulk up’ like a male due to their limited levels of testosterone. It is simply not possible to look like a female version of Arnold Schwarzenegger by participation in a weight  training program. Unless of course you specifically want that result,  which is a whole other topic.
  4. Resistance Training that utilises multi-joint (eg legs, back and chest) and structural exercises (eg a squat and then shoulder press) is recommended to induce sufficient stresses on the skeletal system and to enhance calcium storage in the bone to ward off osteoarthritis and increase or maintain bone density.
  5. Bone mineral density begins to decrease between  30-40 years of age. Females lose approx. 8% and males 3% of their skeletal  mass every decade and are more susceptible to bone density loss the 3-4 years prior to menopause. As we are never really sure when menopause will hit, it pays to start early and keep going! People who participate in activities that are more non-weight bearing, such as swimming, tend not to have as great a bone density as those who do more weight-bearing exercise. Programs that target the major muscles and joints  of the body have a potentially greater impact on maintaining and restoring bone density, than single discipline exercise activities such as walking.
  6. People who have participated in exercise activities over their lifespan, particularly in the first 30 years of life, are in the best position for making the greatest gains in bone density, than those who discover exercise later in life. However, whilst gains can be  made, there is every chance that bone density will return back to pre-exercise levels if the program ceases. More reason to keep moving!
  7. Resistance Training has demonstrated favourable  changes in body composition with minimal changes in body weight. In other words, body fat loss and an increase in lean muscle mass. The more lean  muscle you have, the better your metabolism.
  8. The more lean muscle mass you build through resistance training, the higher the ‘resting energy expenditure’ (REE). Most of the calories you burn during the day is not when you exercise, but when you rest. Your      heart, lungs, digestive system and most importantly, your brain, work 24/7 and require a constant energy supply. As a result, about 70% of your metabolic demands come from REE. If you are moderately active, you burn an additional 20% of calories during ‘activity energy expenditure’ (AEE). The last 10% comes from simple digestion and breakdown of food and metabolism  otherwise known as ‘diet induced thermogenesis’ (DIT).
  9. Obviously if you want to lose weight and keep it  off and start burning more calories while you rest, you have to exercise. Exercise burns extra calories and helps shift unhealthy stubborn fat, and helps you to preserve and build lean muscles that will keep your metabolism high. Muscle tissue is the powerhouse of resting metabolic rate.
  10. Eating and Energy – if you have enough energy through all food groups, and complex carbohydrates, you can exercise at a higher intensity for longer. Which in turn will burn up more  calories just through exercise (past that 20%) and you will boost your metabolism, improve your digestion, and have positive changes on your hormones. So whilst dieting can make you lose weight in the short term,  the best way to maintain weight is through sensible eating and exercising, and you will ward off the inevitable loss of lean muscle tissue that is related to aging. If you cease to exercise you will see drastic drop in your endurance, strength, power and ultimately additional muscle mass. All of this reflects on your REE – the calories you burn at rest and results in a slower metabolism.

But wait…there’s more………

  • Strength training is essential for injury prevention and increased performance. Through strength work you can tend to the weaker supportive muscles that can get neglected such as the gluteus medius, rotator cuff, hip stabilisers, abdominal and lower back region.
  • Strength doesn’t necessarily have to equate to muscle mass and huge bulging biceps – it can simply refer to your increased ability to recruit extra muscle fibres in times of need, such as when you are running up a steep hill.
  • Strength also ensures your joints, ligaments, soft tissue and bones are strong and sturdy enough to withstand repetitive pounding, in running and most sports.
  • Power and Speed also comes from Strength Training. Plyometrics and explosive exercises such as box jumps, squat jumps, lunge jumps etc result in a greater muscle fibre recruitment, which in turn gives you more muscle fibres available for the explosive exercise you are performing. Eg a sprint finish up a hill!

 

Summary

In a nut shell, don’t always rely on cardio exercises such as running to improve your body and performance. If want to change your body, you will have to change your lifestyle and approach to training. Move more and get your heart rate up, and eat better quality food, but make sure you include resistance training in your fitness regime at least twice a week. You should then reduce your body fat, increase your lean muscle mass, lose centimetres, increase your metabolism, prevent injury and improve your performance results.